Is peanut butter low FODMAP?

Is peanut butter low FODMAP?

Learn more about the Surprising Connection Between Eating Peanuts and Improved Digestive Health.

Are you a fan of peanut butter? Peanut butter has been a popular food for decades, Whether added to toast, smothered on apples, or enjoyed straight off the spoon, there's no denying that it can be an incredibly delicious and satisfying part of your diet. But for those on the low-FODMAP diet, it can be a source of confusion.

On one hand, peanuts contains fructose and is therefore off-limits in larger amounts during the elimination phase. So is consuming peanut butter while following the low FODMAP diet possible when you love peanut butter?

In this blog we will discuss exactly that – read on to learn more!

Are there any health benefits of eating peanuts?

It's true that peanuts are high in fat, but they are also an excellent source of plant-based protein and contain a range of beneficial vitamins and minerals. They are also naturally gluten-free, making them a great option for individuals who need to avoid grains due to gluten sensitivities.

Studies have shown that peanuts may be beneficial as part of an overall healthy diet as they contain monounsaturated fatty acids which can help reduce bad cholesterol levels while increasing good cholesterol. They also contain a range of essential vitamins and minerals including vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc which are important for overall health.

In addition, peanuts can be beneficial for digestive health as they contain prebiotics which feed the friendly bacteria in your gut. This helps to promote healthy digestion and improve symptoms associated with IBS.

Peanuts are a root and grow undergrounds.
Peanuts are a root and grow undergrounds.

Can peanut butter cause bowel problems: Is peanut butter low FODMAP or does it trigger IBS symptoms?

Peanuts are high in fat, which can be difficult for individuals with IBS-D as it slows down digestion and may cause symptoms such as bloating and pain.

Some individuals may have peanut intolerance and can experience symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea after consuming peanuts. If this is the case removing peanuts from your diet may be beneficial in improving symptoms.

However, nuts are packed with healthy fats, dietary fiber, and antioxidants which makes them a healthy addition to any diet. Fortunately, most of them are low in FODMAPs! While almonds, cashews, and pistachios are fairly high in FODMAPs, peanuts, pecans, and walnuts are considered low FODMAP foods.

A serving sizes up to 32 peanuts contains only trace amounts of FODMAPs, making it a low FODMAP serving size. Not only can you safely enjoy peanuts, but peanut butter is low in in high FODMAP ingredients well as long as you stick to a 2-tablespoon serving size.

When it comes to buying peanut butter, make sure you choose a natural peanut butter option that's minimally processed and free from added sugars and unnecessary additives. Be sure to avoid peanut butters sweetened with high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Some local health food store or organic market may sell freshly ground peanut butter or have a machine where you can grind it yourself.

The FODMAP content is similar between smooth peanut butter and chunky peanut butter.

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Is there a low FODMAP version of peanut butter?

Fortunately, there are some peanut butters that are considered low FODMAP with the recommended serving size because of the processing method.

Note that chunky peanut butter that contains dry roasted peanuts is still high FODMAP even with a low FODMAP serving.

However, it is important to note that peanuts are still associated with triggering symptoms in those who suffer from IBS and other digestive disorders. It's also possible that some brands of peanut butter may still be high in FODMAPs despite the label claiming otherwise.

It is important to check the ingredients label as well as the FODMAP content to ensure that the peanut butter is confirmed low-FODMAP and suitable for consumption.

It's best to double-check with a dietitian or nutritionist before consuming any low FODMAP peanut butter as some brands may contain hidden FODMAPs such as inulin or lactose which can trigger symptoms.

Bread with peanut butter and banana.
Bread with peanut butter and banana.

What brands of peanut butter are low FODMAP?

In the U.S. there are various peanut butters that are low in fat and have a low FODMAP serving size. Check the labels to avoid foods with more FODMAP ingredients.

In Australia, there are also some brands that have been approved as low-FODMAP such as Sanitarium Peanut Butter, Bega Peanut Butter and Mayvers Peanut Butter. These brands are all certified low-FODMAP and suitable for those following the diet.

It is important to note that due to variations in ingredients between brands, it's best to double-check with a dietitian or nutritionist before consuming any peanut butter as some brands may contain hidden FODMAPs such as inulin or lactose which can trigger symptoms.

In conclusion, peanuts and peanut butter can be a nutritious part of a healthy diet when eaten in moderation and suitable for those following the low-FODMAP diet. However, it is important to check labels carefully as some brands may contain hidden FODMAPs which can trigger symptoms. Speak with a dietitian or nutritionist if you are not sure whether your symptoms are caused by peanuts.

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What nut butters are low FODMAP?

Besides peanut butter, there are a variety of nut butters that are low FODMAP and suitable for consumption on the diet:

are all approved by Monash University as being low-FODMAP in servings up to 2 tablespoons (30g).

It is important to remember that some nut butters may contain added ingredients such as honey, high fructose corn syrup, sugar or high-FODMAP fruits which can trigger symptoms. It's best to check the label carefully and double-check with your dietitian.

How can peanut butter be included in a low FODMAP diet?

Peanut butter has a high quality and wholesome fat content that is shelf-stable and easy to use. This can be eaten in low FODMAP crackers or baked in healthier desserts made from FODMAP-free ingredients. Keep up with the two tablespoons per day dietary recommendations.

Here are 3 simple FODMAP friendly recipes with peanut butter

Peanut butter cookies

Gluten free cookie recipe, where you can whisk some butter through the batter.

Peanut butter cookies.
Peanut butter cookies.

Peanut butter based stir fry

Low FODMAP veggies combined with your favorite protein. For the sauce you can add 1 TBSP of soy and hot sauce.

Chicken Satay with peanut sauce.
Chicken Satay with peanut sauce.

Dark chocolate peanut butter snack

Make your own butter cups by taking a piece of dark chocolate and a scoop of peanut butter on top of it.

Peanut butter cups
Peanut butter cups.

Conclusion: Can I eat peanut butter on FODMAP diet?

In conclusion, peanuts butter is FODMAP friendly when consumed in small portion size (you can check the portion size in a FODMAP app). It is important to note, however, that peanuts are associated with triggering symptoms in those who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other digestive disorders.

It's important to keep an eye on your body's response as eating even small amounts of peanuts can trigger uncomfortable symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and constipation. If you experience any of these symptoms after consuming peanuts or peanut butter, it’s best to speak to your healthcare provider.

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